Jojoba Oil (Simmondsia chinensis oil)

#PlantPowerInEveryShower

Feel the power of nature and introduce jojoba oil to your hair care routine. Jojoba oil is a natural answer to dryness, split ends, and hair thinning.

Bottled sunshine in its purest form

What is Jojoba Oil?

Jojoba Oil is a liquid produced from the seed of the Jojoba shrub, which is native to Arizona, southern California, and northwestern Mexico. The oil takes up to 50% of the jojoba seed weight. Jojoba oil is used as a moisturizer for hair and skin, and recently the benefits were confirmed by dermatologists.

Jojoba oil is also used as a microemulsion, meaning it helps carry the active ingredients in hair care products. Because of that jojoba oil can prevent hair breakage and strengthen your locks. It is also helpful with fighting off dry scalp as its moisturizing properties benefit your strands and skin.

Corner Image

Where does jojoba oil come from?

Jojoba oil comes from the seed of Jojoba shrub. It makes up to 50% of the seed weight. The shrub needs a lot of sunshine so it's no wonder that this plant is native to Arizona, southern California, and northwestern Mexico.

Native Americans used Jojoba oil to treat wounds and sores as it has soothing benefits derived from the high hydration content. Jojoba wasn't domesticated until the early 1970s and before that, it had many different applications as its viscosity was great for the lubrication of machines. But, the healing properties, discovered by Native Americans, outweigh the mechanical ones.

Unrefined jojoba oil appears as a clear golden liquid at room temperature with a slightly nutty odor. Refined Jojoba oil is colorless and odorless. Today it is mainly used for cosmetic and pharmaceutical purposes. The cultivation of Jojoba oil is not hard, you only need a lot of sunshine and really dry weather. It is easiest in sandy soil and nothing has to be added to the ground to provide the shrub with perfect conditions to grow. Harvesting on the other hand is a bit harder as not all the seeds mature at the same time. Most of the seeds are harvested by hand, and only the riped ones are picked off.

Corner Image